“Ready for Sale”… It’s Alive

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He that can have patience can have what he will.

Wild experience indeed waiting for the App to go through QA and become “ready for sale.” Not because we didn’t know it’s a strong App but because this is our first time through the process. Strangest thing was we posted this for review on 4/9/09 but it didn’t go live in the iTunes store until about 7pm PST last night. Add to that we received a notification it was “ready for sale” in the form of an email around 3pm PST yet it was nowhere within the store until hours later. Good info to know and may be worth putting that in the email my iTunes/Apple friends! We thought something was amiss with our app or the store.

Now the fun part begins, sharing the news and marketing the App as well as gathering feedback! The press release will go out early next week and we’ll have an ad on www.zenhabits.net in about a day or so. Thanks Leo! RE: feedback, we’ll probably be posting a form on this site and i’m hopeful we’ll get some quality feedback at the iTunes store as well.

I can tell you we’re already planning several slight tweaks and feature improvements for the next version — to be listed later. At this point, we just want to enjoy the moment and watch what happens when people begin to put Ben Franklin’s 13 Virtues — his simple and powerful daily tracking methodology in action.

I believe it was Gandhi who said, “We must become the change we wish to see in the world.” Frankly, (no pun intended) it’s never been easier with Virtues! To practically and easily apply Benjamin Franklin’s unique methodology (to powerfully tweak our Virtues and habits) AND have the ability to customize said Virtues, the capability is now literally within our grasp.

Thanks too, to everyone for supporting the development process and providing quality feedback along the way.

until next time,

-mg

btw: oh, please feel free to share this post or iTunes link with your friends who might have an iPod or iPhone and be interested. thanks.

How I Raised Myself from Failure to Success in Selling

More positive stories and feedback by applying Benjamin Franklin’s unique daily tracking system now available for the iPhone (link)

Excerpts from Frank Bettger, How I raised Myself from Failure to Success in Selling

Page 187

“I don’t know of anything a sales manager can do for his salesmen that will do so much to assure their success as to make it absolutely compulsory for them to follow this plan.”

Page 186

“Well, I thought, if a genius like Benjamin Franklin, one of the wisest and most practical men who ever walked this earth, believed this (system) was the most important thing he ever did, why shouldn’t I try it? I suppose if I had ever gone to college , or even high school, I might have felt that I was too smart for such a thing as this. But I had an inferiority complex because I only went to school six years in my whole life. Then when I discovered that Franklin had only TWO years of schooling, and now, 150 years after his death, all the worlds greatest universities were showering honors on him, I thought I’d be a fool NOT to try it!

Excerpts from Frank Bettger, How I raised Myself from Failure to Success in Selling

Our Leaders Need Virtues — Washington Needs Virtues

Question:
Wouldn’t it be nice if our current leadership today followed in the footsteps of our GREAT FOUNDING FATHERS?

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With the new Virtues App, it’s a least theoretically possible! (coming soon to Black Berry, no names mentioned — even the Google Android phone)

Write your local Congressmen and Senators. Feel free to share this link w/ your local representative!

Change begins with YOU (then THEM!)

Aristotle, Habits, Equilibrium & Virtues

Aristotle’s first description of moral virtue required that the one acting choose an action knowingly, out of a stable equilibrium of the soul, and for its own sake. The knowing in question turned out to be perceiving things as they are, as a result of the habituation that clears our sight. The stability turned out to come from the active condition of all the powers of the soul, in the mean position opened up by that same habituation, since it neutralized an earlier, opposite, and passive habituation to self-indulgence. In the accounts of the particular moral virtues, an action’s being chosen for its own sake is again and again specified as meaning chosen for no reason other than that it is beautiful.

… In our earlier example of temperance, I think most of us would readily agree that the one who had his eye only the chocolate mousse found less pleasure than the one who saw that it would be a better thing to share it. And Aristotle does say explicitly that the target the temperate person looks to is the beautiful. (1119b, 15-17) But since there are three primary moral virtues, courage, temperance, and justice, it is surprising that in the whole of Book V, which discusses justice, Aristotle never mentions the beautiful. It must somehow be applicable, since he says it is common to all the moral virtues, but in that case it would seem that the account of justice could not be complete if it is not connected to the beautiful.

Found it fascinating to run across this site (Aristotle & Ethics) and how all these themes are so tightly interwoven. Full article and website can be found HERE.